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News stories tagged with "amy-ivy"

Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/reway2007/1021562555/">reway2007</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: reway2007, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Prepping the summer flower garden for more color

There's lots of activity in the vegetable garden this month, but horticulturist Amy Ivy turns her attention to flower beds this week.

She told Todd Moe a summer cleanup in the annual and perennial gardens means more color later in the season. Amy shares tips on what to prune and how to encourage new blooms on some of the cooler season flowers.  Go to full article
Tomato plants starting up a trellis. Photo: <a href="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3648/3650652836_ca568ea7e6_o_d.jpg">Charles Dawley</a>, Creative Common, some rights reserved
Tomato plants starting up a trellis. Photo: Charles Dawley, Creative Common, some rights reserved

Some tomato tips before the season kicks into high gear

Even if you don't have a garden, you can grow tomatoes in a sunny spot on your front steps or patio. They're one of the most popular vegetables. But they take some tending over the growing season. Horticulturist Amy Ivy has some early season tips for keeping tomatoes healthy this summer.  Go to full article
Part way done: some perennials back in place, soil amendment continues. Photo by Martha Foley
Part way done: some perennials back in place, soil amendment continues. Photo by Martha Foley

Out with the bad: taking control of the perennial garden

The first step can be the hardest when you've got a major Quackgrass infestation, or an "aggressive" perennial that's taking over. In Martha Foley's garden this spring, it was both. Sometimes you just have to dig everything up and start over.

Amy Ivy is a horticulturist with the Cornell Cooperative Extension service with Clinton and Essex County. She sympathizes, and shares tips on taking advantage of the opportunity to improve the soil.  Go to full article
A bird's nest compost bin. Photo: Tompkins County Cooperative
A bird's nest compost bin. Photo: Tompkins County Cooperative

Kitchen compost: a gift for the garden

Compost is a key ingredient to increasing the organic matter in garden soil. And now is a great time to add it as a layer in the garden to help nourish seeds and seedlings.

Amy Ivy, horticulturist for Cornell Cooperative in Clinton and Essex Counties, explains some of the best ways to use compost in your garden, and alternatives if you don't have your own.  Go to full article
Spring surprise--voles at work. Photo: Martha Foley
Spring surprise--voles at work. Photo: Martha Foley

Why does my lawn look like a giant ant farm?

The spring thaw has finally reached dirt, revealing the winter damage underneath. On lawns, that could include dramatic networks of dirt-lined runways left under this winter's snow pack by voles.

Voles work the surface, tunneling through where the snow meets the lawn. They're vegetarians, and like to eat away at the roots of the grass. Horticulturist Amy Ivy says the lawn's probably too soft to walk on yet, and it's probably too soon to do too much in the way of repair just yet. When things dry out a bit, she suggests raking the damaged area lightly, to level the tunneled areas out. And have some grass seed on hand to reseed after the weather warms up.

Moles throw up bigger mounds of dirt from their underground tunnels. Rake those to spread the dirt around; those areas can be reseeded to grass later as well.

Amy says it's also time to do some remedial pruning where trees and shrubs were broken during the winter. And she talks about best practices for pruning flowering shrubs now.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/cafemama/3554624390/in/photolist-6q7nZq-9bWxWy-4FjXbD-48C15n-4B7ks-d33Bcu-4B1fJL-84PDiw-hos2oJ-kmJZQ-Po95f-9kkqg2-hovRDL-ahtbyB-ieJUqN-adLfQb-9Ak9XY-6vikT9-JVDMJ-dAKsT8-83YQcJ-6tNG25-6bCcDi-eh96Pz-6fGSZF-db5C2U-db5BxQ-db5BMC-NxEpj-a4sQ2N-8o4Pya-6f6qui-7PKvEd-4WbwDb-6KeovC-5ek7mn-4X8zQM-2kaEaN-5fgsDp-6jCjBC-7YiN6B-8sZy9F-d33BaN-d33Be9-dWehH-89JiNr-avWqyt-9LbTLM-81LwZ9-4LAwRo">Sarah Gilbert</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Sarah Gilbert, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Gardening call in gleanings: potato scab, blueberry canes, green manure

Horticulturist Amy Ivy and Martha Foley takes up some odds and ends of questions listeners had during our Spring Gardening Call-in program. Issues covered include scab on beets and potatoes, care of blueberry canes, and what you can use in place of compost if you can't get hold of it.  Go to full article
Martha Foley's husband Everett Smith illustrating how deep the snow is inside their 7-foot garden fence, last Thursday just after the last big snow. Photo: Martha Foley
Martha Foley's husband Everett Smith illustrating how deep the snow is inside their 7-foot garden fence, last Thursday just after the last big snow. Photo: Martha Foley

Your garden and the deep, deep cold

Extreme cold nights this week are adding to concerns about how this cold, snowy and icy winter will affect how the yard and garden will grow this year. How deep is the frostline? Is the snow cover protecting perennials? Or is an icy crust smothering the grass? What about flowering shrubs?

Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy says the consequences of the winter likely won't be good, especially as trees and shrubs may be beginning to "wake up" as spring approaches. That makes them more vulnerable to the cold. But she says there really isn't much you can do, except wait and see.  Go to full article
Garden crop rotation can maintian soil fertility, reduce disease and increase yields. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/57217144@N00/476016841/">Annie and John</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Garden crop rotation can maintian soil fertility, reduce disease and increase yields. Photo: Annie and John, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Why rotate crops in your backyard garden?

Just like big farms, the backyard garden can benefit from rotating vegetable crops. Cornell Cooperative Extension Horticulturist Amy Ivy says small-scale crop rotation can minimize pests and disease and increase yields. Todd Moe spoke with Amy about deciding which crops to plant in the vegetable garden from one year to the next. She says a knowledge of vegetables and their botanical families is helpful.  Go to full article
Wait a little longer for the intense cold to pass before pruning. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ndrwfgg/82103133/">Andrew Fogg</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Wait a little longer for the intense cold to pass before pruning. Photo: Andrew Fogg, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Gardening: Is it too soon to prune?

Martha Foley and Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturalist Amy Ivy talk about what it is, and isn't, safe to do in your garden this early in a very chilly year, and how to simulate spring indoors.  Go to full article
Food from the Farm: Eating Local in the North Country takes place Saturday, March 1, 2-5 pm in the Plattsburgh City Gym. Photo: Cornell Cooperative Extension
Food from the Farm: Eating Local in the North Country takes place Saturday, March 1, 2-5 pm in the Plattsburgh City Gym. Photo: Cornell Cooperative Extension

Plattsburgh event showcases local food, even in the dead of winter

Most gardens are a long way from yielding those delicious spring and summer veggies, but you could still make a meal of the food on offer from professional growers, livestock farmers, brewers and vintners. Not to mention maple syrup makers.

The annual "Food from the Farm" event in Plattsburgh on Sat., March 1, will showcase the food, and the farmers.  Go to full article

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