Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "big-tupper"

Some environmental activists have continued to oppose the ACR project.  File photo
Some environmental activists have continued to oppose the ACR project. File photo

Nearly two years later, Big Tupper resort tangled in court

We reported yesterday that a volunteer group ARISE plans to reopen the Big Tupper ski area this winter. The group is hoping to keep the ski area active until the Adirondack Club and Resort project moves forward.

Many locals hope that developers will eventually reopen the mountain as a commercial ski center, helping to revitalize the village's economy.

The resort received the permits that it needs to build hundred of homes, condos and great camp mansions nearly two years ago from New York state.

But the project has been on hold ever since, because of a lawsuit filed by green groups. As Brian Mann reports, it now appears that a final decision could come early next year.  Go to full article
Jim LaValley, head of ARISE and a local realtor, says Big Tupper ski area will reopen this winter on a day-by-day-when-snow-allows-basis.  (NCPR File PHOTO)
Jim LaValley, head of ARISE and a local realtor, says Big Tupper ski area will reopen this winter on a day-by-day-when-snow-allows-basis. (NCPR File PHOTO)

Big Tupper to reopen this winter

A volunteer group in Tupper Lake has announced that they'll reopen the Big Tupper Ski Area this winter for as many days as possible.

Jim LaValley, head of a group called "ARISE," say there won't be artificial snow-making. But volunteers will operate the ski lift and open the lodge whenever natural snow-fall allows.

LaValley said the mountain will be run as a "no frills" operation, but will still "provide a great ski experience."

There will be no season tickets sold. Day passes are expected to sell for $25.

The group still needs a permit from the Airondack Park Agency and hopes to raise more funds to help pay for trail grooming and other work on the mountain.

ARISE operated Big Tupper for three seasons, using mostly volunteer workers. But the mountain didn't operate last year.

Tomorrow during the 8 O'clock Hour, Brian Mann has an update on the Adirondack Club and Resort project, which includes the Big Tupper ski area.  Go to full article
Lead developer Tom Lawson (R) with Tupper Lake town supervisor Roger Amell (L, seated) at a political gathering last week. Photo: Brian Mann
Lead developer Tom Lawson (R) with Tupper Lake town supervisor Roger Amell (L, seated) at a political gathering last week. Photo: Brian Mann

Big Tupper resort an election year issue

The Adirondack Club and Resort proposed for Tupper Lake has been delayed by a lawsuit filed by two environmental advocacy groups, and the case is now being reviewed by judges in Albany. But with election day less than a month away, the future of the resort is also on the agendas of politicians.

There appears to be bipartisan support for the development, which has been on the drawing board for nearly a decade.  Go to full article
Environmental groups want to know what was said in more than a dozen email "threads" about the resort between Gov. Cuomo's office and APA staff. Photo: Brian Mann
Environmental groups want to know what was said in more than a dozen email "threads" about the resort between Gov. Cuomo's office and APA staff. Photo: Brian Mann

Green groups question Cuomo's role in Big Tupper review

Environmental groups say they suspect that Governor Andrew Cuomo may have meddled illegally in the decision to grant permits for a big new resort in Tupper Lake. The project was given the green light earlier this year by the Adirondack Park Agency.

State officials say the permits were given after a fair and impartial review. But two green groups are demanding information about what role the governor's office played in the process.  Go to full article
Developers Michael Foxman (left) and Tom Lawson (right) accuse environmental activists of waging a "war of attrition" against their project. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Developers Michael Foxman (left) and Tom Lawson (right) accuse environmental activists of waging a "war of attrition" against their project. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Green groups raise new challenge to Tupper Lake resort

State officials are rejecting a claim by two environmental groups that permits for the new resort in Tupper Lake are invalid because developers failed to meet a deadline for satisfying permit conditions.

On Monday, Protect the Adirondacks and the Sierra Club issued a letter arguing that a six-month grace period had expired in July, requiring developers to begin the permitting process again.

But in a statement, Adirondack Park Agency spokesman Keith McKeever said that the resort has a "ten year tie period" to complete requirements.  Go to full article
Jim LaValley, head of ARISE and a local realtor, wants the resort to move forward and calls legal challenges "frivolous." Photo:  Brian Mann
Jim LaValley, head of ARISE and a local realtor, wants the resort to move forward and calls legal challenges "frivolous." Photo: Brian Mann

Frustration over Big Tupper resort lawsuit turns to anger

This summer, the mood in Tupper Lake has turned tense and sometimes ugly as debate continues over the future of the Adirondack Club and Resort.

Developers hope to build hundreds of mansions and townhouses just outside the village, along with a marina, a new ski center and other amenities.

Many local residents and business owners see the project as a new economic engine for the village. But environmental groups and a small group of property owners in Tupper Lake sued last winter. They hope to overturn state permits for the resort, issued by the Adirondack Park Agency.

The conflict has sparked fierce letters to the editor, angry yard signs and friction between neighbors.

In the coming weeks, Brian Mann will be talking with people on all sides of the debate about the future of Tupper Lake. He began with Jim LaValley, a local real estate agent who formed the group ARISE to help build public support for the resort project.  Go to full article
Green groups say the APA permits for the Big Tupper resort violated environmental rules, but state officials and the developers are defending the process (PHOTOS:  Brian Mann)
Green groups say the APA permits for the Big Tupper resort violated environmental rules, but state officials and the developers are defending the process (PHOTOS: Brian Mann)

Adirondack Club and Resort lawsuit moves forward

In March, two environmental groups and a small number of landowners sued the state of New York, hoping to invalidate permits allowing construction of the Adirondack Club and Resort in Tupper Lake. Green groups argued that the Adirondack Park Agency had failed to enforce key regulations designed to protect open space in the Park.

The lawsuit has been moving forward, with all sides filing legal briefs with the state Supreme Court. Brian Mann spoke about the latest developments with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
Green groups say resort developers Michael Foxman (L) and Tom Lawson held undisclosed talks with APA staff. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Green groups say resort developers Michael Foxman (L) and Tom Lawson held undisclosed talks with APA staff. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Green group suit: secret talks shaped APA's resort decision

A coalition of environmental groups and local landowners filed suit this week, hoping to block construction of the Adirondack Club and Resort in Tupper Lake. The lawsuit claims that state officials ignored key environmental rules protecting open space and wildlife in the Park.

But the suit also alleges that members of the Adirondack Park Agency broke the law by meeting secretly with the resort's developers in the weeks before commissioners voted 10-to-1 to approve the project.

As Brian Mann reports, that claim is based in part on a story that first aired here on North Country Public Radio back in January.  Go to full article
Environmental activists like Richard Brummel suffered a major defeat last week. Photos: Brian Mann
Environmental activists like Richard Brummel suffered a major defeat last week. Photos: Brian Mann

Disarray in Adirondack environmental community, defeat on Tupper resort

Last week's decision by the Adirondack Park Agency to allow construction of a massive new resort in Tupper Lake was a major defeat for environmental groups. Developers of the Adirondack Club and Resort won permission to build more than 700 luxury homes and condos, much of it on timberland that borders the High Peaks Wilderness.

Green activists spent much of the last decade opposing the project, insisting that it would set dangerous precedents for future development. But debate over the resort came at a time when once-powerful environmental groups were disintegrating, faltering under financial strain and deeply divided over the movement's agenda.

As Brian Mann reports, last week's vote could signal a balance of power in Park debates as environmentalists scramble to regroup.  Go to full article
Park Agency commissioners vote 10-to-1 to approve the massive resort. Photos: Brian Mann
Park Agency commissioners vote 10-to-1 to approve the massive resort. Photos: Brian Mann

In historic APA decision, commissioners downplay environmental risks

On Friday, the Adirondack Park Agency voted to approve the largest project in the Park's modern history, giving the green light to a massive resort planned around the Big Tupper ski area.

Supporters hope the project will bring hundreds of jobs to the Adirondacks, and revitalize the economy of Tupper Lake. Hundreds of people gathered in the village Friday night to celebrate the historic decision.

Critics say developers haven't developed a realistic business plan for the resort. And they worry that hundreds of mansions and condos will create sprawl on the edge of one of the Park's biggest wilderness areas. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

1-10 of 69  next 10 »  last »