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News stories tagged with "culture"

SUNY Potsdam anthropology professor Karen Johnson-Weiner
SUNY Potsdam anthropology professor Karen Johnson-Weiner

Amish cope with tragedy and its "Big Media" aftermath

As the legal side of the kidnapping case kicks into gear, the St. Lawrence County Amish community is coping with the tragic ordeal.

An expert on Amish culture and religion says their coping hinges on the Amish sense of faith "by a deep belief that whatever is happening, they are in God's hands," says Karen Johnson-Weiner, an anthropology professor at SUNY Potsdam who has written several books about the Amish. "I think that provides them with a kind of courage that some of us might not have that keeps them from giving in to the despair."  Go to full article
SUNY Potsdam students use trowels and brushes to gently excavate soil and peel through layers of history along the Raquette River in Potsdam. Photo: Todd Moe
SUNY Potsdam students use trowels and brushes to gently excavate soil and peel through layers of history along the Raquette River in Potsdam. Photo: Todd Moe

SUNY Potsdam students dig into history along the Raquette River

Student archaeologists excavating a site along the Raquette River in Potsdam have unearthed pieces of prehistoric Native American pottery, stone tools and part of a spear tip that could be 5,000 years old.

The SUNY Potsdam Anthropology Department is overseeing the summer school program on college property along the river. It allows budding young scholars the chance to get their hands dirty while learning more about uncovering buried artifacts, mapping and field research.

Todd Moe stopped by the dig site recently to watch the students search for more clues to the North Country's ancient past.  Go to full article
The first group of St. Lawrence students to travel to Kenya, in January of 1972. Furthest to right: Peter French; Anne Chene os next to him. Paul Gilbert is sixth from the right. Photo: St. Lawrence University, Special Collections and Vance University Archives
The first group of St. Lawrence students to travel to Kenya, in January of 1972. Furthest to right: Peter French; Anne Chene os next to him. Paul Gilbert is sixth from the right. Photo: St. Lawrence University, Special Collections and Vance University Archives

How a North Country college + an African country = community

This past weekend St. Lawrence University saw a record turnout for its alumni reunion. On top of the usual festivities, this year marked another big moment in St. Lawrence history: the 40th anniversary of its study abroad program in Kenya. The first group of students travelled from Canton to Nairobi in 1972, for a two-week program, but since 1974 it's been a semester-long experience. And the connection to the East African country runs even deeper--each year since the mid-'80s, St. Lawrence has been awarding two Kenyan students full scholarships to come and do their four years of college here in the North Country.

Alumni in attendance included two members of Kenya's parliament, as well as several founders and CEOs of nonprofits devoted to bettering the lives of people in Kenya.  Go to full article
Third generation co-owner Peter Depthereos in front of The Crystal. Photo courtesy of TAUNY
Third generation co-owner Peter Depthereos in front of The Crystal. Photo courtesy of TAUNY

Watertown's oldest restaurant faces eviction deadline

Last week, the North Country learned that one of its iconic places to eat has been served an eviction notice. The Crystal, Watertown's oldest restaurant, opened its doors more than 90 years ago, and since the '40s, it's been run by the Dephtereos family.  Go to full article
Kids, kids and more kids packed the Saranac Lake Winter Carnival parade on Saturday. Photo: Brian Mann
Kids, kids and more kids packed the Saranac Lake Winter Carnival parade on Saturday. Photo: Brian Mann

Listen: Music from Saranac Lake's Winter Carnival parade

The ten-day-long Saranac Lake Winter Carnival wrapped up Sunday night with fireworks blasting and flaring above the ice palace.

One of the big events of the carnival is the parade on Saturday.

This year our very own Brian Mann helped emcee the parade along with Andy Flynn from the Lake Placid News.  Go to full article
Signposts along the way. Photo: Sarah Harris
Signposts along the way. Photo: Sarah Harris

Defining the Champlain Valley

During the holidays we're listening back to some of our favorite stories from 2013. Some are newsy, others are just fun. A taste of summer in this story.

Lake Champlain means different thing to different people. It's a border between Vermont, Quebec, and New York. It's where people go to fish, swim, and boat. People cross it to get to work or see their families. It's even a drinking water supply. Reporter Sarah Harris spent a week driving around the lake and asking people what it means to live in the Champlain Valley. Here's what she learned.  Go to full article
Charlotte, Vermont artist, teacher and writer Elizabeth VanBuskirk.  Photo: Elizabeth VanBuskirk
Charlotte, Vermont artist, teacher and writer Elizabeth VanBuskirk. Photo: Elizabeth VanBuskirk

Books: "Beyond the Stones of Machu Picchu"

Over the last 30 years, Vermont weaver, writer and teacher Elizabeth VanBuskirk has traveled to the land of the Incas -- the ancient citadel Machu Picchu, the Sacred Valley and Cusco. She and her husband, David, loved the region, its people and culture so much that that they helped found the Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco.

VanBuskirk has collected some of her own favorite stories and Inca folktales in a new book, Beyond the Stones of Machu Picchu.  Go to full article
Shelburne Museum's new Center for Art and Education opens August 18th.
Shelburne Museum's new Center for Art and Education opens August 18th.

New building will expand Shelburne Museum's cultural reach

The Shelburne Museum opens its new Center for Art and Education this summer, and for the first time in the museum's 66-year history, it will be open year-round. Todd Moe talks with Shelburne Museum Director Thomas Denenberg about the new building, which will include galleries, an auditorium and classroom.  Go to full article
Adirondack storyteller Mitch Lee.  Photo: Mitch Lee
Adirondack storyteller Mitch Lee. Photo: Mitch Lee

National Storytelling Day: "The White Feather" by Mitch Lee

Today is the first day of spring. It's also World Storytelling Day -- a global celebration of the art of oral storytelling, celebrated every year on the vernal equinox in the northern hemisphere, the first day of autumn in the southern. Everyone has a story to tell, and there are lots of storytellers in our region.

For over 25 years, Mitch Lee has been telling tales about life in the mountains and the big woods. He was born and raised in the west-central Adirondacks. When he isn't busy spinning tales at schools, libraries and community groups, Lee runs the Parks Department in Inlet, NY where he helps promote local tourism. He also writes the weekly column, Growing up Adirondack, for The Weekly Adirondack newspaper. Todd Moe spoke with Mitch Lee about his love of telling tales and asked him to share a favorite local story called, The White Feather.  Go to full article
The Ticonderoga outside the Skenesborough Museum in Whitehall, NY. Photo: Sarah Harris
The Ticonderoga outside the Skenesborough Museum in Whitehall, NY. Photo: Sarah Harris

What happens to an old warship, 200 years later?

The war of 1812 may seem like it happened a long time ago. But in Whitehall, New York, residents have a daily reminder: the Ticonderoga.

For the past 50 years, the battleship has been sitting squarely on the lawn of the Skenesborough Museum. But it's not clear who's responsible for preserving the boat.  Go to full article

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