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News stories tagged with "photo-lead"

Randy Douglas heads the Essex County board of supervisors
Randy Douglas heads the Essex County board of supervisors

Essex County faces tough budget choices

Essex County now faces a budget deficit next year that could top 9 million dollars. That's ten percent of the county's budget that still needs to be paid for.

The soaring costs are being blamed on scheduled pay increases for county workers, rising utility coasts, and the cost of operating the Horace Nye nursing home in Elizabethtown.

The latest blow came this week, when the Board of Supervisors announced that health insurance costs could rise by as much as 46%.

Brian Mann spoke about the budget crunch with Randy Douglas. He's town supervisor in Jay and serves as county chair.  Go to full article
Siena Research Institute's polls offer a much clearer snapshot of the NY-20 and NY-24 races.
Siena Research Institute's polls offer a much clearer snapshot of the NY-20 and NY-24 races.

Siena: Gibson, Hanna struggling in House races

Exactly six weeks remain until election day. Here in northern New York, Republicans are pushing hard to unseat three sitting Democrats, congressmen Mike Arcuri, Scott Murphy, and Bill Owens. These races could help decide which party holds a majority in the House of Representatives.

But new polls published over the last few days by the Siena Research Institute show that in two of these races the Republican candidates are struggling to catch up.

Brian Mann spoke in-depth with Siena pollster Steven Greenberg, who says Republicans Chris Gibson and Richard Hanna need to lock down the loyalty of GOP voters. "It is key for both of the Republican candidates...to bring the base back home," Greenberg says.

He calls the 24th district House race "incredibly competitive," but says the 20th district race will be more of a struggle for Gibson. "I think the 20th definitely has the potential to be a competitive race," he adds.  Go to full article
Bill and Tomi Gallagher (Photo:  Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)
Bill and Tomi Gallagher (Photo: Lou Reuter, Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

The Hospice Path: Helping the helpers

When a patient enters a hospice program at the end of their life, a lot of the focus is on their experience, their choices, and their preparations for death.

As part of our on-going series, called the Hospice Path, we've been profiling Bill Gallagher.

He began working with High Peaks Hospice after doctors told him that his lungs were weakening and couldn't be treated.

This morning, Brian Mann shifts the focus to Tomi Gallagher, Bill's wife. They've been married and caring for each other for nearly seven decades.

Tomi Gallagher says hospice is now offering her important help, while she and her husband navigate this difficult transition.  Go to full article
Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser
Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser

Immigration bureaucracy lands legal residents in detention

One wrinkle in the immigration picture has been particularly difficult for foreign students and professionals working in the U.S.

There are two agencies within Homeland Security that handle visas. The one that issues them is U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. It says a foreign national may reapply or change a visa status "in a timely manner" before its expiration date. The visa itself may take weeks or months to process. The U.S. Border Patrol however, only looks at the expiration date.

If a person's visa has expired, that person is subject to detention. Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser of Ithaca has defended clients caught between these two interpretations of the law. She told David Sommerstein one was a Filipino national living in Watertown.  Go to full article
Mark Barie, co-founder of UNYTEA
Mark Barie, co-founder of UNYTEA

Tea Party leader says movement is "bigger" than Doug Hoffman

Two days after the Republican primary in the 23rd district, the election drama continues.

Doug Hoffman issued his first statement late yesterday afternoon calling the race "fluid." Hoffman said "thousands of absentee and military ballots remain to be counted," adding -quote--"There is no clear victor."

Watertown businessman Matt Doheny still holds a lead of roughly six hundred votes. But at least 1700 absentee ballots remain to be counted. It remains unclear whether Hoffman will continue in the campaign as a third-party Conservative.

Meanwhile yesterday one of Hoffman's closest allies through the primary told North Country Public Radio that the Hoffman campaign had been mismanaged and is "no longer viable." Mark Barie, head of UNYTEA, says he will "throw Doug Hoffman under the bus" if that's what it takes to beat Democrat Bill Owens in November. Barie spoke with Brian Mann last night.  Go to full article
Rep. Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh) (File photo)
Rep. Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh) (File photo)

NY-23: Owens launches fall campaign, decrying "pessimism and anger"

While Republicans are still sorting out their primary results from this week's election in the 23rd district, Democrat Bill Owens began broadcasting his first campaign ad yesterday.

Owens, a businessman and attorney from Plattsburgh, holds a sizable fundraising lead over his Republican and Conservative opponents.

Owens faces a national mood that appears to be running strongly against Democrats.

But he enters the fall campaign with a unified party, and support from at least some Republicans.

Owens spoke yesterday with Brian Mann about the contest going forward.  Go to full article
Matt Doheny addresses supporters. Photo: Mike Benjamin, WRVO
Matt Doheny addresses supporters. Photo: Mike Benjamin, WRVO

NY-23: Doheny leads, no Hoffman concession

Last night, Watertown Republican Matt Doheny asserted victory following a see-saw political battle that went on for more than two hours after polls closed.

"I look forward to making sure that the people of the 23rd congressional district have a conservative alternative," Doheny said, in an interview with YNN TV.

At one point, Doug Hoffman -- the tea party insurgent from Lake Placid -- led by more than 500 hundred votes. But with an unofficial tally completed, the Associated Press called the race for Doheny, who held a lead of roughly 450 votes. Doheny urged Hoffman not to run on the Conservative Party line.

Just after 1 a.m., the National Republican Congressional Committee echoed Doheny's victory claim. The GOP argued that Doheny had established himself as the candidate with "the experience to help turn around the ailing economy and bring much-needed jobs to the North Country."

The outcome was a blow to Hoffman supporters who gathered at the Red Fox restaurant in Saranac Lake. Jim Gallagher, who retired from the Air Force and lives now in Peru, described the apparent defeat as heartbreaking.

"I'm a firm believer that we need to get the Republican Party back to its conservative roots," he said. Gallagher -- like others here -- said he would not shift his support to Doheny.

At the end of last night, as both political camps packed up to go home, Doug Hoffman still had not addressed his supporters or journalists. A campaign aide made a brief appearance and said, "You will not see Doug Hoffman tonight."

That peculiar decision -- which angered many journalists who had waited more than four hours for a chance to speak with the candidate -- calls into question Hoffman's commitment to soldiering on with the Conservative Party. Hoffman is expected to make a statement about his plans on Wednesday morning.

This outcome sets the stage for a likely show down between Doheny and Plattsburgh Democrat Bill Owens.

One important dynamic last night was geography, with Hoffman commanding the eastern half of the 23rd district and Doheny dominating in the western counties. That same pattern could hold true in the general election, with the Republican and Democrat hailing from opposite sides of the 23rd.  Go to full article
Can NY Democrats like Bill Owens (Plattsburgh) and Scott Murphy (Glens Falls) hang on in this year's political climate?  (File photos)
Can NY Democrats like Bill Owens (Plattsburgh) and Scott Murphy (Glens Falls) hang on in this year's political climate? (File photos)

In North Country skirmishes, Republicans battle for a New York comeback

Republicans are expected to dominate this November's mid-term elections. But to win a majority in the House, they'll likely need to capture at least a handful of Democratic seats in states like New York, where the GOPs track record has been dismal.

Republican leaders in New York think they have a very real shot at a comeback. They're targeting five conservative-leaning districts, including three here in the North Country.

As Brian Mann reports, Democrats are scrambling to stem the tide.  Go to full article
Resort developers Tom Lawson (L) and Michael Foxman (R) during yesterday's proceedings (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Resort developers Tom Lawson (L) and Michael Foxman (R) during yesterday's proceedings (Photos: Brian Mann)

Big Tupper developers win round in court, Nature Conservancy cries foul

Developers of a new resort in Tupper Lake won a major victory yesterday when a local jury awarded them road access to a 1200-acre parcel of land.

The decision will allow the Adirondack Club and Resort to maintain a short road easement across neighboring property owned by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.

The company says they needed access in order to move their project forward. The green group says the developers wanted to take their private property rights.

Brian Mann was in Tupper Lake and has our story.  Go to full article

Strange legal battle pits Nature Conservancy against Tupper developers

A strange kind of local trial is underway this week in Tupper Lake. Developer Michael Foxman and his partners are hoping to build the Adirondack Club and Resort on property that includes the old Big Tupper ski area.

But to gain permanent road access to more than 1200 acres of the resort property, the company needs legal rights to cross a small parcel of land owned by a neighbor. It turns out that neighbor is the Adirondack Nature Conservancy, which owns the Follensby Pond tract. The group hopes to sell the land to the state of New York to be added to the state forest preserve.

The Conservancy has said publicly that it doesn't want to sell or give away the access rights. So Foxman and his partners have begun a legal proceeding that could force the Conservancy to allow access to the road. The issue has sparked protests and an angry exchange in the Tupper Lake Free Press.

Brian Mann was in Tupper Lake yesterday and spoke about the case with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

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