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News stories tagged with "race"

Nelson Mandela and Denis Goldberg. Photo courtesy of Denis Goldberg
Nelson Mandela and Denis Goldberg. Photo courtesy of Denis Goldberg

A belief in justice: Denis Goldberg, Mandela's trialmate

Today is the first day of Passover, a Jewish holiday celebrating liberation. One visitor to the north country this week has devoted his life to the struggle for freedom--Denis Goldberg.  Go to full article
Image: <a href="http://www.waynegrady.ca/books/emancipation-day/">waynegrady.ca</a>

Ontario writer Wayne Grady's novel explores race, deception

Kingston writer Wayne Grady grew up in a white working class family in Windsor, Ontario. Years later, while researching his family's history, Grady discovered that his father had grown up as the youngest son of a black working class family in Windsor. Grady's novel, "Emancipation Day," imagines his father's secrets and deceptions on his journey from black to white.  Go to full article
The  Rev. Oberia Dempsey campaigned early against drugs in Harlem. Photo: Wikipedia
The Rev. Oberia Dempsey campaigned early against drugs in Harlem. Photo: Wikipedia

Why did black leaders support America's drug war for so long?

This year, North Country Public Radio is looking in-depth at America's forty year long drug war. Tough-on-crime policies, sparked in part by New York's Rockefeller drug laws, changed the way we think about crime and justice and addiction. They also changed the North Country, as more and more prisons were built to house the swelling number of inmates.

This morning, our series continues with a look at how the drug war has been viewed within the African American community. Some black leaders see tough crime laws as racially biased and unfair. But many supporters of the drug war hoped that long prison sentences and harsh penalties would help clean up neighborhoods plagued by drugs.  Go to full article
Bud Fowler as a member of the 1885 Keokuk, Iowa, baseball team. Photo courtesy the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY
Bud Fowler as a member of the 1885 Keokuk, Iowa, baseball team. Photo courtesy the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY

A century later, an African American baseball hero gets his due

This weekend, the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, near Utica, is holding its annual induction ceremony. It's the sport's greatest honor to be enshrined in the Hall.

One Upstate New York baseball legend is not in the Hall. Most people don't know his name, even though he owns an historic distinction.

In 1878, John Jackson - aka Bud Fowler - became the first African American to play professional baseball with white men. His career spanned more than 30 years as a player, manager and entrepreneur.

Fowler grew up in Cooperstown. Last spring, the town recognized his story of perseverance in the face of bigotry. David Sommerstein was there and has our story.  Go to full article
Hammond, NY, where the crime is alleged to have taken place. Image: maps.google.com
Hammond, NY, where the crime is alleged to have taken place. Image: maps.google.com

Hammond man faces felony charges after cross burning

After allegedly burning a cross on his lawn and shouting racial slurs at the guest of a neighbor, Ryann Wilson, of the St. Lawrence County town of Hammond, is facing felony aggravated harassment charges.

Wilson is being held at the St. Lawrence County Correctional Facility with a $10,000 cash bail or $20,000 bond. Officer Robert Rusaw of the correctional facility says Wilson is headed to court Wednesday to face the harassment charge.  Go to full article
Bud Fowler as a member of the 1885 Keokuk, Iowa, baseball team. Photo courtesy the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY
Bud Fowler as a member of the 1885 Keokuk, Iowa, baseball team. Photo courtesy the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY

A century later, African-American baseball hero gets his due

Jackie Robinson is getting the big time Hollywood treatment with the new blockbuster "42". Meanwhile, a much lesser known African American baseball hero is getting his due in the cradle of baseball history.

In 1878, John Jackson - aka Bud Fowler - became the first African-American to play professional baseball with white men. His career spanned more than 30 years as a player, manager and entrepreneur.

Fowler grew up in Cooperstown, NY, the home of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Last weekend, the town recognized his story of perseverance in the face of bigotry.  Go to full article
Cornelius Eady reading and talking ab out his nature poetry at ACW's event at Paul Smiths VIC. Photo courtesy Adirondack Center for Writing
Cornelius Eady reading and talking ab out his nature poetry at ACW's event at Paul Smiths VIC. Photo courtesy Adirondack Center for Writing

Nature poetry, black poetry

Poetry is one of the ways we've learned to think and talk about the natural world. In the United States writers like Emerson, Dickinson and Frost have shaped the language we bring to nature and wildness.

But largely missing from that tradition and conversation is the poetry of African-American writers. For the better part of a century, black writing has been seen reflexively as an urban expression, rooted in the life of cities. Now some African-American writers and editors are trying to change that, arguing that new words and points of view can broaden the language of nature.  Go to full article
Articles written in 1928 about the incident at Massena.
Articles written in 1928 about the incident at Massena.

Massena's history still tied to 1928 "blood libel" incident

A St. Lawrence County community is being reminded, again, of an 80 year-old rumor many people would rather forget.

A new novel re-imagines what happened when a little girl went missing overnight in Massena. It's based on a true story from 1928. The town's small Jewish community was accused of kidnapping her for a ritual murder.

Julie Grant set out to find out what really happened. She found that after 80 years, it's not easy to parse the truth from rumors and memories.

But she did find that people from cultures around the world brought together in America's "melting pot" were easily pulled apart in a time of crisis.  Go to full article

The race for St. Lawrence County Clerk

The election of a county clerk usually doesn't get much attention. The office processes paperwork: passports, pistol permits, mortgages, and vehicle registrations. But this year, people are watching the race for clerk in St. Lawrence County. And the two candidates think that's largely because the office has started making money. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article
She was being subjected to racist conduct that was not being addressed by the school district.

In Saranac Lake, racial bullying sparks $6 million lawsuit

A young girl who was bullied, harassed and assaulted in school because of her race has filed a $6 million federal lawsuit against the Saranac Lake Central School District.

The girl and her parents, Amy and Hiram Oliveras, filed a complaint last week in U.S. Northern District Court, alleging the school district violated her civil rights and the state's Human Rights Law by failing to protect her from bullying, racial discrimination and harassment.

Martha Foley reports,  Go to full article

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