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News stories tagged with "war"

Jefferson County legislative chairwoman Carolyn Fitzpatrick looks on as Sen. Charles Schumer speaks in Watertown Wednesday. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Jefferson County legislative chairwoman Carolyn Fitzpatrick looks on as Sen. Charles Schumer speaks in Watertown Wednesday. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Schumer: Ft. Drum shouldn't "come within a whiff" of Army cuts

New York Senator Chuck Schumer says he's not afraid to use his political might to protect Fort Drum from cuts to the military budget. Schumer held a press conference at Watertown city hall Wednesday as the Pentagon prepares to axe up to 100,000 U.S. Army troops.  Go to full article
David Crane, professor of practice at Syracuse University's College of Law, is helping to build legal cases against the worst actors in the Syrian civil war. Photo: Daily Orange, Syracuse University
David Crane, professor of practice at Syracuse University's College of Law, is helping to build legal cases against the worst actors in the Syrian civil war. Photo: Daily Orange, Syracuse University

Syracuse prof building case against Syrian human rights abusers

A few weeks ago, David Crane got a call. The Syracuse University law professor was asked to join a team who would be examining a collection of tens of thousands of gruesome photographs.

They appeared to show widespread torture and killings at detention facilities run by Syrian president Bashar al-Assad's government.  Go to full article
Kat Evans plays non-traditional student, and combat veteran, Erika Bird, in "Nontraditional". Still from film courtesy Clarkson University
Kat Evans plays non-traditional student, and combat veteran, Erika Bird, in "Nontraditional". Still from film courtesy Clarkson University

Struggles of female warrior in Potsdam-made feature film

Tonight at the Roxy Theater, a new full-length film with a mostly North Country cast makes its local premiere. "Nontraditional" was filmed almost entirely in Potsdam and on the Clarkson University campus.

It's the fictional story of a female combat veteran struggling to return to civilian life. The story is based on interviews directors Brian Hauser and Christina Xydias did with female veterans. It's also based on Hauser's personal experiences as an Army veteran.

Listen to an interview with writer/director Hauser and co-producer Xydias. Hauser told David Sommerstein the main character is 26 year-old Erika Bird. She was a military police officer in Afghanistan and Iraq. And now she's returning home to get a college degree.

The film has its local premiere tonight at 7:15 at the Roxy Theater in Potsdam.  Go to full article
SUNY Canton Assistant Librarian Michael Magilligan interviews Otis E. Van Horne, Canton, a 1942 graduate and former SUNY Canton instructor, about his experiences serving during World War II.  Photo: Greg Kie
SUNY Canton Assistant Librarian Michael Magilligan interviews Otis E. Van Horne, Canton, a 1942 graduate and former SUNY Canton instructor, about his experiences serving during World War II. Photo: Greg Kie

War stories: SUNY Canton's veterans' living history project

SUNY Canton will pay tribute to North Country World War II veterans with a Living History Ceremony Friday night in advance of Veterans Day. Todd Moe talks with librarian Mike Magilligan, who spent the past year recording stories from the Second World War. It's part of a larger project to collect oral histories from veterans in the region.  Go to full article
R. H. Thomson
R. H. Thomson

An actor's response to remembering a world war

Next year marks the centennial of the start of World War I, and a Canadian actor/director is in the midst of planning an international event for the 100th anniversary of the First World War.

R.H. Thomson is perhaps best known as Jasper Dale in the Canadian televison series, Road to Avonlea. Recently, he played Alexander in the Thousand Islands Playhouse production of No Great Mischief.

In 2008, Thomson co-created the 1914-1918 Vigil, a project that saw the names of more than 68,000 Canadians who died during the war projected onto memorials and buildings across Canada.

Todd Moe spoke with him about creating a multi-national WWI centenary project called "The World Remembers," which Thomson calls a unique, powerful effort that speaks to younger generations.

Over the past two years, Thomson has visited government officials and war archives across Europe. His goal is a collective remembrance of all the war dead.  Go to full article
U.S. Rep. Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh)
U.S. Rep. Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh)

Owens welcomes "rational alternative" to military strikes in Syria

Secretary of State John Kerry is in Geneva for talks with his Russian counterpart on a plan to secure and destroy Syrian chemical weapons.

The U.S.-Russia talks may offer a way to avoid U.S. strikes against the Syrian government for a chemical attack on civilians the U.S. blames on Syrian President Bashar Assad.

The talks ease the pressure on Congress to weigh in on possible military action against the Assad regime.

North Country Congressman Bill Owens welcomes the potential change in direction.  Go to full article
A missile interceptor site in Alaska. Photo: U.S. Army. Some rights reserved.
A missile interceptor site in Alaska. Photo: U.S. Army. Some rights reserved.

Ft. Drum shortlisted for missile site that may never be built

The Department of Defense is including Fort Drum near Watertown as one of five sites to be studied for a new East Coast missile defense program. Local officials hailed the decision. But as David Sommerstein reports, the Pentagon itself says it has no money to build the site.  Go to full article
NY Congressman Bill Owens at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for Fort Drum's Warrior Transition Battalion Complex in May 2012. Photo: Army Medicine, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
NY Congressman Bill Owens at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for Fort Drum's Warrior Transition Battalion Complex in May 2012. Photo: Army Medicine, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

What Owens still needs to know before Syria vote

North Country Congressman Bill Owens says he needs more information before deciding whether to vote for or against military action against Syria.

The Democrat says he believes President Obama has demonstrated that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad was behind a deadly chemical weapons attack in Syria last month.

Owens praises President Obama for seeking Congressional approval before authorizing military action against Syria. "There's been a fair amount of criticism against the executive branch over the last, probably, 30 or 40 years," says Owens, "for usurping Congress' prerogative relative to the declaration of war, so I thought this was a good move."

But how Owens will vote is another matter. He's still undecided. And he says he recognizes that Americans are weary of war.  Go to full article
Todd Phelps, owner of the Black River Adventurers Shop, Watertown, says he supports strictly limited U.S. intervention in Syria to punish President Bashar Assad's regime for its use of chemical weapons. He shared his views with Congressman Bill Owens during a recent bike ride the two shared in Watertown. Photo by Joanna Richards
Todd Phelps, owner of the Black River Adventurers Shop, Watertown, says he supports strictly limited U.S. intervention in Syria to punish President Bashar Assad's regime for its use of chemical weapons. He shared his views with Congressman Bill Owens during a recent bike ride the two shared in Watertown. Photo by Joanna Richards

Listen: North Country messages for the president

As President Obama makes his push this week to convince Congress to intervene in Syria, we asked north country residents what they think of the situation.

It's not just government that's debating military action in Syria. Yesterday reporter Sarah Harris went to the Mountain Mart and the Price Chopper and Miner Street parking lots in Canton to hear what people in the North Country think. Almost everyone she talked to said they want the U.S. to stay out of the conflict.

Joanna Richards talked with a pair of soldier's wives in a shop in Watertown's Public Square. They were trying on gowns for an Army ball, and said simply they didn't want their husbands to go away again. But other people she talked with also had strong opinions on the issue. One man said he'd tell President Obama to stay out.  Go to full article
Josh Jones, an Army veteran who served two tours in Iraq, takes a chemistry test at Paul Smiths College. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Josh Jones, an Army veteran who served two tours in Iraq, takes a chemistry test at Paul Smiths College. Photo: Mark Kurtz

As war winds down, vets face job hurdles

The U-S has made big gains in recent years, helping young military veterans re-integrate into civilian life. Unemployment for men and women who fought in Afghanistan and Iraq has dropped.

But the jobless rate and homelessness for young service-members remains higher than for the population overall.

And veteran advocate groups say many vets still face discrimination and a lack of opportunity.

Last year, we profiled a group of military veterans studying at Paul Smiths College.

That series, produced in partnership with WBEZ-Chicago, was recognized this summer with a national award from the Public Radio News Director's association.

Here's the second part of Brian Mann's profile that first aired in November.  Go to full article

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