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News stories tagged with "work"

Frank Forney, Philadelphia, cutting wood with his nephew on Route 11 in Antwerp. Photo: David Sommerstein
Frank Forney, Philadelphia, cutting wood with his nephew on Route 11 in Antwerp. Photo: David Sommerstein

Listen: The man who painted one of the St. Lawrence's tallest bridges

You never know who you're going to meet by the side of the road in the North Country.

David Sommerstein stopped to chat with a guy sawing firewood, and it turns out he painted one of the tallest bridges over the St. Lawrence River.

David Talked with Philadelphia's Frank Forney about wood cutting, suspension bridges, and why they're always green.  Go to full article
Josh Cameron (right) and Conant Neville are paid interns this summer at NCPR. Photo: Martha Foley
Josh Cameron (right) and Conant Neville are paid interns this summer at NCPR. Photo: Martha Foley

Interns...pay them, or not?

Recent lawsuits have focused attention of the issue of unpaid internships. Rulings from a federal court in New York have removed any ambiguity -- saying that the majority of these positions are illegal.

But does the court's decision reflect the reality of the marketplace?  Go to full article
Frank Forney, Philadelphia, cutting wood with his nephew on Route 11 in Antwerp. Photo: David Sommerstein
Frank Forney, Philadelphia, cutting wood with his nephew on Route 11 in Antwerp. Photo: David Sommerstein

Heard Up North: the guy who painted the Thousand Islands bridge

You never know who you're going to meet by the side of the road in the North Country. David Sommerstein stopped to chat with a guy sawing firewood recently. It turns out he painted one of the tallest bridges over the St. Lawrence River. Today's Heard Up North features Frank Forney of Philadelphia.  Go to full article
St. Lawrence Health Initiative Exec. Director Ruth Fishbeck says all 13 of her employees have similar standing desks in their offices. Photo: Todd Moe
St. Lawrence Health Initiative Exec. Director Ruth Fishbeck says all 13 of her employees have similar standing desks in their offices. Photo: Todd Moe

The health effects of workplace mobility

Recently on NPR's Morning Edition, we've heard stories about health-conscious office workers standing at work, at special elevated work stations. In America, we tend to spend more than half of our waking hours sitting down. On an average day this will probably consist of driving, working at a desk, and then relaxing in front of the TV.

A Potsdam organization - St. Lawrence Health Initiative - has been using standing desks for all 13 employees for more than a year. Executive Director Ruth Fishbeck says she'd also like to experiment with treadmill desks. Todd Moe stopped by recently to talk with Fishbeck about the health benefits of standing at work - weight loss, more energy and better concentration. And, she says, it doesn't mean standing all day.  Go to full article

Warmer office could mean better health, researcher finds

It's not unusual for people to wonder if their offices are making them less healthy: people complain of a lack of fresh air, sick coworkers, and uncomfortable chairs, to name a few. In Binghamton University's bioengineering labs, researchers are looking for ways to make workplaces healthier.  Go to full article
Critics say the Department of Labor "scrubbed" its website of documents about child safety on farms
Critics say the Department of Labor "scrubbed" its website of documents about child safety on farms

Critics say farm safety rules scrapped because of election year politics

The Obama administration has scrapped an effort to introduce new safety regulations designed to protect the tens of thousands of kids who work in agriculture.

Many farmers are applauding the decision to shelve the rules, calling it a victory for their rural way of life.

But safety experts say more teenagers under the age of 16 die each year working on farms than in all other industries combined.

With the presidential election just six months away, supporters and critics alike say the new rules were just too controversial. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article
Everett Smith at work.
Everett Smith at work.

Heard Up North: splitting wood

There were clear skies, cool temperatures...and a woodpile. A perfect combination for our Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Frances Fairchild, Chazy Public Library director, with the new library's stained glass installation
Frances Fairchild, Chazy Public Library director, with the new library's stained glass installation

Librarians talk about their jobs

These are tough times, as libraries grapple with changing technology and shrinking budgets. But librarians in Clinton County say their work is more important than ever. Sarah Harris talked with Stan Ransom, Frances Fairchild, Betsy Brooks, Eva Jankowska and Jacqueline Madison, all librarians in Clinton County.  Go to full article
Are cities like Toronto healthier than US cities because of the social safety net?  (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Are cities like Toronto healthier than US cities because of the social safety net? (Photo: Brian Mann)

Is a strong social safety net helping boost Canada's economy?

This week, as part of a partnership with WBEZ public radio in Chicago, Brian Mann is traveling in Ontario, talking about the very different impact of the recession north of the border. It turns out, workers living just a few miles away, in Canada, have experienced the economic downturn very differently than workers here.

While American cities along the Great Lakes like Buffalo and Rochester struggle and lose population, Toronto and Montreal are growing. They've even added jobs through the recession. Workers who do lose their jobs in Canada have a much more comprehensive social safety net and that may be helping to stabilize and boost the country's overall economy. Brian Mann speaks with Martha Foley from Toronto.  Go to full article
Local workers helped to build the historic new Champlain Bridge (Photo:  Susan Waters)
Local workers helped to build the historic new Champlain Bridge (Photo: Susan Waters)

Bridge move delayed - mason proud of the work this year

It's raining this morning in the Champlain Valley and the National Weather Service has issued a wind warning for the big lake. That means engineers won't be moving the big arch that's needed to complete the new Crown Point bridge. That effort has been pushed back to tomorrow morning.

Patrick Salerno is one of the local workers who's spent much of the last year pushing to finish the new span. He's a mason from Port Henry. Salerno told Brian Mann that he's proud to have been part of building the bridge. But he says working conditions were often "brutal."  Go to full article

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